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Depression, Joy and a Moment of Fame by The Foxes

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Reviewed on 1st August 2010.


Depression, Joy and a Moment of Fame

By The Foxes

The Foxes' 'Depression, Joy and a Moment of Fame' EP brings the sunshine with three light, summery indie-pop songs, before finally capturing your full attention with the unusual, subtly humorous 'Country Low.'

The most memorable of the three upbeat summer-songs, is the beautifully hazy 'Something About You.' The blurry-eyed guitar-work is complimented by the occasional starburst of acoustic strumming and melt-in-the-mouth, lilting vocals. 'Something About You' tumbles to a gorgeous finale, where The Foxes layer on additional guitar lines in a lush swirl of sun-kissed sound. 'Get Me' is a livelier take on that feel good vibe. This is the sort of silly, but charismatic, indie-pop that comes with plenty of hand-claps and "bah-dah-dah-dah!" backing vocals. It's a simple but effective song, but it does miss a trick, with a chorus that falls slightly flat and fails to completely seal the deal.

'No Reply' crams in far too many disorientating changes of mood and pace, making this one of those songs that feels too much like hard work. It does stumble into one standout moment, as The Foxes jam together some shambolic chord-plucking and lashings of those perfectly harmonised backing vocals The Foxes do so well. It's a quirky combination, made even edgier by the combination of Nigel Thomas 's rich, soulful crooning and charmingly everyday lyrics ("there's no reply from you today / but anyway / I guess there won't be now I told you to get lost.") Unfortunately, this ingeniously odd combo is all but lost in 'No Reply's many twists and turns.

This brings us to 'Country Low,' which might just be the most unsettling song ever written about "going for a walk in the country." The creeping bass, tribal drumbeats and eerie, shivery guitar set the stage for some dark vocal performances: those harmonised backing vocals have a ghostly, hollow quality to them and Thomas occasionally dips his voice to a spine-tingling drone. As with 'Get Me,' The Foxes do seem to run out of ideas when they get to the chorus, but this EP is worth purchasing just to hear Thomas gravely intoning "in the country," against a backdrop of skin-crawling bass. A uniquely black-hearted tale of going for a walk in the country.

'Depression, Joy and a Moment of Fame' is an indie-pop EP with plenty of character. 'No Reply,' 'Get Me' and 'Something About You' are breezy, summery fun and an enjoyable listen, but with 'Country Low' The Foxes pique your interest, and will have you keeping an eye out for future releases.



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